Read e-book Quest For The True Cross: The Templar Series: Part One

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Sep 14, David Blanar rated it really liked it. Not my typical fare but there is a cracking good yarn here, wrapped up in a tale rooted in Middle Age historical fiction.

McMahon keeps the pace deliberately slow through the exposition, teeing up a mix of characters spanning continents and kingdoms, but it all comes together with a bang in the climax. The set-piece action sequences are top-drawer and worth savouring, particularly as the author is an equal-opportunity sadist: no side emerges clean or un-bloodied from this campaign, with few hero Not my typical fare but there is a cracking good yarn here, wrapped up in a tale rooted in Middle Age historical fiction.

The set-piece action sequences are top-drawer and worth savouring, particularly as the author is an equal-opportunity sadist: no side emerges clean or un-bloodied from this campaign, with few heroes left in the wake of smouldering wreckage spanning multiple continents. Recommended for its high-quality battles and its general ability to acknowledge that war has no winners.

Holy Grail

Jun 05, Jim rated it it was amazing. This book isn't for the faint of heart. Although with ISIS committing acts of savagery today, you might be deadened to such violence. The actors here are well developed and the writing is excellent.

The storyline flows and I was happy to read this. You feel as if you're there. Jul 24, Margaret Cross-Beliveau rated it liked it Shelves: goodreads-giveaways. Unfortunately I lost the book, so I am unable to give it a review. Feb 21, Russ rated it it was ok Shelves: first-reads-giveaways. A great read, my sort of story. Looking forward to more. May 10, Richard Tearle rated it liked it. Sir William de Mandeville is a Templar Knight sent home from the Holy Land in disgrace as he has been subject to 'demons' in his mind. A Syrian healer saves him from crude surgery to cure him and supplies him with drugs to stave off the demons.

Quest for the True Cross: The Templar Series: Part One (Paperback or Softback) | eBay

Arriving back in England, he is ordered to the service of a vindictive old monk and learns that his father has died in dishonour and his brother is now the Earl of Essex, making life most unpleasant for his tenants with his sadistic ways. William also lear Sir William de Mandeville is a Templar Knight sent home from the Holy Land in disgrace as he has been subject to 'demons' in his mind. William also learns that a relic of the True Cross has been stolen from the Templar's care and has been taken to Portugal. William resolves that the only way to redeem both himself and his dead father is to recapture the relic and return it to England with the aid of his Syrian friend and a boy thief he saves from severe punishment.

With these two companions, he travels through France and Spain before arriving in Portugal. Its a decent enough tale, the battle scenes are well written and quite graphic whilst a large amount of research has clearly gone into its telling. Jun 06, Catherine Boardman rated it it was amazing. Cracking Crusader novel. Handsome heroes, dastardly aristocrats, conniving clergy and top notch history. Need more conclusion It was definitely a good read. I needed more closure on his unborn child and friend left in Portugal. Maybe a second book is in the works.

Let's hope so. View 1 comment. Jan 08, Ian Varty rated it it was ok. I have read other books on the same subject that were more absorbing. I was a little let down by this one. I'm just glad it was a give away. Dec 07, Bartell Keithley Sr. Good read. The author kept it moving, no real slow spots. Really enjoyed the characters and truism of history facts. Michaela rated it liked it Mar 02, Michaela rated it really liked it Feb 04, Georgiann Hennelly rated it really liked it Sep 29, Ettelwen rated it liked it Jul 09, Terry Haning rated it it was amazing Aug 18, Derek Donwerth rated it liked it Jun 18, Don rated it liked it Jun 10, Deborah rated it did not like it Mar 25, Jeff Donaldson rated it liked it Oct 23, Matthew rated it really liked it May 29, Don Holbrook rated it it was amazing Apr 21, Bruce rated it really liked it Aug 16, Haven rated it it was amazing Jan 15, Russ M rated it really liked it Jul 02, Mario Chaides rated it it was amazing Apr 13, Simon Sheminant rated it really liked it Mar 02, Robbie Flaherty marked it as to-read Apr 04, Ton marked it as to-read Apr 19, Yaw Addae marked it as to-read May 13, Arto Bendiken marked it as to-read Jun 19, Daniel Muncey marked it as to-read Dec 20, Heath marked it as to-read Feb 02, K Clouse marked it as to-read Jan 07, Julia Conway marked it as to-read Jan 13, Carla marked it as to-read Jan 13, Rhonda Stefani marked it as to-read Jan 13, Frederick Rotzien marked it as to-read Jan 13, Micielle marked it as to-read Jan 13, Nicola Fantom marked it as to-read Jan 13, Erik marked it as to-read Jan 13, Dawn marked it as to-read Jan 13, Stella Clarkson marked it as to-read Jan 13, The Tattooed Book Geek Drew.

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Marcia marked it as to-read Jan 13, In , the Mamluks — a cast of Egyptian slave soldiers who had conquered Egypt and Syria — swept through these states into the eastern Mediterranean and the Crusaders lost their foothold in the Holy Land. A lot of blame was attached to the Templars because of this — their duty had been to protect the Crusader States and they had manifestly failed. On Friday 13 October , agents of the king turned up at Templar houses with a list of mostly bogus and maliciously concocted accusations against the order.

The result was a long-running inquisition, which ran from in France and spread across every other kingdom in western Christendom. By , the Templars were declared to be institutionally corrupt; they were abolished, rolled up and their property was given away. Two years later, in , the last grandmaster was burned at the stake and that was the end of the order as it had been known in the Middle Ages. The plot of Knightfall follows a grail quest. How did the Templars become linked with the holy grail? Wolfram placed into his story something called the Gral the grail , which the Templars have been repeatedly linked to ever since.

In my reading of the story — and I think a lot of historians would read it in the same way — the grail is a metaphor for Jerusalem. And who were better to guard Jerusalem than the Templars? If we were to just disregard all of the myths and legends, the question would be: why are we making a show about the Templars at all?

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Why not the Knights Hospitaller? Why not the Teutonic Knights? Why not any of the other military orders? There is a reason that the Templars keep coming back to us and part of that is because they have been consistently linked with these legends and myths, which are just as much a part of their history. Are the characters in Knightfall based on real people from history, or are they fictional?

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The characters are a combination of real historical people and characters from established Templar mythologies. There are also a huge range of fictional characters that originate from the fact that the Templars can be traced right back to the origins of the Arthurian stories in the 12th and 13th centuries. In , fictionalised Templars were appearing in Arthurian legend all the time, so in Knightfall we meet Templars called Gawain, Landry, Parsifal and Tancrede.

They are all searching for the holy grail. Absolutely — no one in their right mind would make a TV show with no strong female roles! The roles of women in the Middle Ages are quite sensitively explored in Knightfall and are some of the most interesting in the show.

In the first instance, we have the wife of Philip IV. She is referred to as Queen Joan in the show, but her real name was Juan. How did you get involved with Knightfall , and what was your role as a historical consultant? I first got involved with the show shortly after it was given the green light by History, and from the outset I was reading the scripts and providing informal feedback. As the show went into pre-production and then production, I came on board in a more official capacity to advise wherever I was needed.

Everyone involved in the show wanted to know as much as possible about the history of the Templars. Sometimes decisions were taken because of a desire for historical fidelity; sometimes decisions leant the other way. What you see with Knightfall is a blending of history with established legends.

The first scene of the first episode is a great example. This aspect of the story is true and is based on original chronicle sources that document the Templars evacuating the city. I think anyone who turns on a historical drama expecting to see something with the narrative architecture and factual veracity of a scholarly article has totally failed to understand the form and the medium that they are watching. The whole idea of historical drama the clue is in the name is drama as well as history.