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They imprisoned two Capuchins and the widow's agent's wife before taking them to France, but they left the widow d'Aulnay alone. But financial matters are seldom solved so easily. Le Borgne himself came to Acadia in and, in July, compelled the widow d'Aulnay, now Madame La Tour , to verify his claims to her late husband's estate. But all of Le Borgne 's efforts were for naught. In the summer of , the English re-appeared in force, and, again, they came to stay. Much had transpired on the isle of Great Britain since the English and Scots last held Acadia in In the s, civil war erupted in England, pitting King Charles I against his recalcitrant Parliament, whose forces eventually were led by the dour Puritan, Oliver Cromwell.

Charles, however, was a stubborn Scotsman and refused to follow the reforms that Parliament had exacted from him. He was arrested, tried, and convicted as an enemy of the state! His heirs, sons Charles and James, fled to France to escape a similar fate. England became a Commonwealth, the monarchy was abolished, and by , Cromwell had become England's Lord Protector. Meanwhile, war had broken out between the English and the Dutch, which Cromwell ended successfully in During that struggle, in , an English seaborne expedition under Robert Sedgwick of Boston, a former lieutenant of Cromwell, was ordered to attack the Dutch colony at New Amsterdam, south of New England.

But before he could attack New Amsterdam, Sedgwick learned that the war against the Dutch had ended. He sailed north, instead, to Acadia, where, in August, he seized Fort St. Doucet designated Bourgeois as a hostage to insure that he fulfilled the articles of surrender, and then Doucet , as ordered by the English, returned to France. Emmanuel Le Borgne , who claimed the seigneurie of Port-Royal, also signed the surrender document. Sedgwick left Port-Royal in charge of a council of inhabitants headed by syndic Guillaume Trahan. La Tour and Denys made deals with their new English overlords and continued their operations unmolested.

The fort on the St. Denys operated from Fort St. Two years later, in , Fort St. He did not remain there long. Meanwhile, Emmanuel Le Borgne used two of his sons first to placate and then to harass the English conquerors. Leverett and Sedgwick "enforced a virtual trade monopoly on French Acadia for their benefit, leading some in the colony to view Leverett as a predatory opportunist.

Leverett funded much of the cost of the occupation himself, and then petitioned Cromwell's government for reimbursement. Although Cromwell authorized payment, he made it contingent on the colony performing an audit of Leverett's finances, which never took place. Meanwhile, Sir Thomas Temple, heir to the Alexanders of Stirling, was named governor of Nova Scotia in , replaced Leverett in May , and consolidated his claims in the colony, including posts claimed by the Le Borgnes.

Temple hurried to Acadia from Boston, counterattacked, wounded the young Le Borgne , captured him, and sent him to London as a prisoner of war, where he was "held captive for some years. He retook the fishing settlement of Port Rossignol, on the Atlantic coast, but, after learning that England's King Charles II had instructed Temple not to surrender the colony just yet, Alexandre returned to France. As their numbers grew by natural increase, the settlers at Port-Royal moved farther up the basin and into the valley above it, creating new farm land from the marshes along the river with their sturdy dykes and clever aboiteaux.

It bears now fine and good wheat. All the inhabitants there are the ones whom Monsieur le Commandeur de Razilly had brought from France to La Have; since that time they have multiplied much at Port Royal, where they have a great number of cattle and swine. This was their home now. They had begun the unconscious process of becoming Acadians, not just Frenchmen. Their sons and daughters grew up and found suitable mates among their neighbors.

Married sons moved even farther upriver and, with the help of family and friends, wrested from the salt marshes new plots of ground on which to raise food for families of their own. The older folks looked forward to the birth of grandchildren and the blessings of an extended family. A spirit of independence and self-sufficiency had taken hold of these French farmers. France, in spite of herself, had planted sturdy roots in the troubled soil of Acadia. Sixteen years of English occupation was over. The colony was finally back in French hands, this time under royal governance; the often chaotic rule of the proprietors and concessionaires was over.

The years of English occupation, ironically, had been beneficial ones for the Acadians. During the time of English control, a lucrative trade had sprung up between Acadia and New England, and there had been a notable growth of settlement in the Port-Royal basin. One historian records that "there was a substantially larger number of settlers up the Port Royal River above the fort than there had been sixteen years earlier; in Acadian terms almost a generation had grown up. It has been inferred that after many of the French settlers moved on to Quebec or returned to France.

For those who remained and they were, we think, the majority , we have to assume the gradual but inexorable increase of numbers and expansion of agriculture, the planting and reaping of grain, peas, flax, and vegetable crops, and the tending of sheep, swine and cattle. If the period is largely a tabula rasa in the historical record, it was nevertheless one of consolidation and expansion of this nucleus of the Acadian population. With the full resumption of French control in Acadia under Governor Grandfontaine, immigration into the colony resumed in earnest, and the Acadians' illicit trade with New England merchants continued unabated.

Other settlers arrived from Canada. Here was created a list of the First Families of Acadia, including families that had lived in the colony for over three decades. Few of the men who fathered these first families were fur traders or fishermen, as in the early days. Some were artisans, laborers, soldiers, sailors, clerks, and even high officials. Most, however, were farmers, labourers , as the French called them, sturdy members of the peasant class who put down deep roots in the rich soil of Acadia--soil that they themselves literally created with their dykes and aboiteaux.

In the first census could be found the names of two families whose progenitors had come to the colony with Razilly in the early s:. Germain Doucet , sieur de La Verdure, had come to Acadia in his middle age and may have been alive in he would have been in his late 70s , but he was not in Acadia.

After the English seized the colony in , they compelled the "captain at arms" to return to France, and they would not have welcomed him back as long as they controlled the colony. Counted in the census, however, were Germain's two grown sons, Pierre and Germain, fils , who had remained in the colony when their father returned to France. Pierre was 50 years old at the time of the census, and Henriette was With them were five children, three sons and two daughters. They lived on 4 arpents of land along the basin and owned 7 cattle and 6 sheep.

Henriette gave Pierre 10 children, including five sons who created families of their own. Germain, fils was 30 years old at the time of the census, and Marie was They had three children, all sons, and lived on 3 arpents of land with 11 cattle and 7 sheep. Marie gave Germain, fils nine children, including five sons who created families of their own. Pierre Comeau the barrel maker was still alive in and still working as a cooper at age He had married year-old Rose Bayon in c, when he was Rose may have come to the colony as a child aboard the St.

Father Molin did not give her age, but she would have been about 40 years old in Living with them on 6 arpents of land along the basin were seven unmarried children, five sons and two daughters. They owned 16 cattle and 22 sheep. Rose gave Pierre nine children, including five sons who created families of their own. They were living with one child, an infant daughter, on "no cultivated land," but they did own 7 cattle and 7 sheep.

A few of the passengers who had come to Acadia aboard St. Pierre Martin of St. They lived on 2 arpents of land along the basin and owned 7 cattle and 8 sheep. Older son Pierre, fils , age 45, and his first wife, an Indian named Anne Ouestnorouest dit Petitous, age 27, whom he had married in c, were living with four sons on 8 arpents of land and owned 11 cattle and 6 sheep.

Anne would give Pierre, fils nine children, including two sons who created families of their own. Mathieu married in the early s, in his early 50s, but he and his wife, whose name has been lost to history, had no children. By the early s, they were living on his seigneurie at Cobiguit in the Minas Basin.

One of their two daughters was counted in the census--Jeanne, age 40, married to Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois , age Guillaume, too, had remarried in the colony, to Madeleine, daughter of Vincent Brun , in c; Guillaume was 65 years old and his bride only 19 at the time of the wedding; she was age 25 in Living with them on 5 arpents of land along the basin were three young sons, ages 4, 3, and 1.

Guillaume and Madeleine owned 8 cattle and 10 sheep. She gave Guillaume seven children, including the three sons, all of whom created families of their own. Oldest son Guillaume, fils married Jacqueline dite Jacquette, a daughter of Martin Benoit and widow of Michel de Forest , at Port-Royal in c; she gave him eight children, including five sons who created their own families. Second son Jean-Charles married Marie, a daughter of Charles Boudrot , at Port-Royal in c; she gave him a dozen children, including six sons who created families of their own.

Jean Gaudet 's son Denis, who had come to the colony with his parents and two sisters in the s, was 46 years old in He had married Martine Gauthier , six years his senior, in c; she was 52 years old at the time of the census. Living with them were three unmarried children, two sons and a daughter, on 6 arpents of cultivated land along the basin. They owned 9 cattle and 13 sheep, with "more lambs than mature sheep," Father Molin noted. Martine gave Denis five children, including two sons who created families of their own. His first wife had died, and he had remarried to Nicole Colleson , probably a young widow, in c; she was 64 years old in They lived "on 3 arpents of land at two locations," with 6 cattle and 3 sheep.

He was 62 years old in , and she was Living with them were seven unmarried children, two sons and five daughters, on 4 arpents of land along the basin. They owned 12 cattle and 8 sheep. Antoinette gave Antoine 11 children, including fives sons who created families of their own. They owned 15 cattle and 5 sheep. Marie, age 26, was married to Vincent Breau , age Jean, age 24 or 25, was married to Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Martin ; she was Living with them on 15 arpents of land were two young daughters.

They owned 3 cattle and 5 sheep. Marguerite gave Jean nine children, including two sons who created their own families. They lived with a daughter, age unrecorded she was still an infant , on "no cultivated land, " and owned 6 cattle and 9 sheep. Charles, who preferred to call himself a Gottreau , was 34 years old in He does not appear with his father in the first Acadian census though his name and age are recorded as belonging to the family because he no longer lived in the colony.

He was 58 years old in , and she was Marguerite, age 17, was counted with husband Jacques dit Jacob Girouard , age 23; they, too, were newly wedded. Living with them on 6 arpents of cultivated land were four children, two sons and two daughters. They owned 13 cattle and 3 sheep. Marie gave Claude 14 children, including three sons who created families of their own.

Jean's third son Bonaventure dit Venture, age 27, was counted with wife Jeanne, age 26, a daughter of Michel Boudrot. Living with them on 2 arpents of land was a young daughter. They owned 6 cattle and 6 sheep. Jeanne gave Venture four children, none of them sons, but three of their daughters married. Jean's older daughter Jeanne, age 27, was counted with husband Pierre Thibodeau , age Living with them on 2 arpents of land was a young son. They owned 5 cattle and 2 sheep. Jean's younger daughter Catherine, age 20, was counted with husband Pierre Guilbeau , age Jean's second son, Jean, fils , who would have been age 32 in , does not appear in the census; he may have taken his wife, who he had recently married, to Canada her name, as well as the names of their children, if they had any, have been lost to history.

He was age 50 and she was 38 in Living with them on 6 arpents of land were eight unmarried children, three sons and five daughters, the youngest a daughter who was only a year and a half old. They owned 4 head of cattle and no sheep. Germain married Marie, daughter of Vincent Breau , in c; she gave him a dozen children, including five sons who created families of their own.

They lived on 10 arpents of land along the basin with six unmarried sons and owned 18 cattle and 26 sheep. Vincent Brun , like most of the bachelors who had come to the colony during the Razilly years, returned to France. They were living on 5 arpents of land with two unmarried children, a son and a daughter.

They owned 10 cattle and 4 sheep. He was 50 years old and she was 40 in They were living on 8 arpents of land with two unmarried children, a son and a daughter. They owned 16 cattle and 6 sheep. They owned no land, but they had an infant son, 7 cattle, and 3 sheep. Marguerite gave Jacques dit Jacob 14 children, including nine sons who created families of their own.

They, too, owned no land but had an infant daughter, 7 cattle, and a sheep. Younger daughter Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, age 17, was counted with her husband, Thomas Cormier , a carpenter, age She gave him only three children, one of them a son who created a family of his own.

They were living on 12 arpents of land along the basin with three unmarried children, a daughter and two sons.

à : to, toward, towards

They owned 10 cattle and 6 sheep. He married Huguette Lambelot in c He was 50 years old and she was 48 in They were living on 6 arpents of land along the basin and owned 10 cattle and 6 sheep. They had no children. He was age 50, and she was 56 in They were living on "no land" with two unmarried children, a son and a daughter, and owned 11 cattle and 8 sheep. His two wives gave him seven children, including four sons who created families of their own.

Vincelotte was 40 years old and Marie was 26 in They lived on 4 arpents of land along the basin with four young children, two sons and a daughter. They owned 9 cattle and 7 sheep. Marie gave him a dozen children, including five sons who created their own families. Settlers from other parts of France who were counted in the first census had come to Acadia in the s, during the years of struggle between La Tour and d'Aulnay:.

Abraham Dugast or Dugas of Chouppes, Poitiers, a gunsmith, came to the colony in c and married Marguerite, a daughter of Germain Doucet , sieur de La Verdure, in c In , Abraham was 55 years old and Marguerite, called Marie-Judith by census taker, was They lived on 16 arpents of land with six unmarried children, three sons and three daughters. They owned 19 cattle and 3 sheep. All three of Abraham's sons married and created families of their own. Martin, who was 15 in , married Marguerite, a daughter of Claude Petitpas , in c; she gave him only two children, including a son who created a family of his own.

Youngest son Abraham, fils , who was only 10 in , married Jeanne, a daughter of Pierre Guilbeau , in c; she gave him six children, including a son who created his own family. They lived on 6 arpents "of cultivated land at two locations" with three unmarried children, two sons, both grown, and a teenage daughter. They owned 18 cattle and 7 sheep. Two of their children, a daughter and a son, created families of their own. Son Jean, the second with the name, married Marie-Anne, a daughter of Pierre Doucet , in c; she gave him 14 children, including seven sons who created families of their own.

Marie was 38 years old in and lived on 3 arpents of cultivated land with eight unmarried children, five sons and three daughters, the youngest a son who was only a year old. Also counted in the census was her oldest daughter, Marie, age 20, with her husband Michel originally Gereyt de Forest , age 33, a Dutchman who had converted to Catholicism to marry his Acadian sweetheart. Younger daughter Marguerite, age 19, had recently married Frenchman Jean-Jacques, called Jacques, LePrince , who would have been in his mids in , but they were not counted in the census; Jacques probably had taken her to another part of the colony where Father Motin did not venture, or perhaps they had gone to Canada no matter, they returned to Acadia by the s and settled near her younger siblings in the Minas Basin.

Jacques dit Jacob became a surgeon and married, Jeanne, daughter of Guillaume Trahan , in c; this made him a brother-in-law of Sieur Germain. Jacques was 50 years old in , and Jeanne was They lived with nine unmarried children, two sons and six daughters, on "more or less 20 arpents of cultivated land at two different locations" along the basin. They owned 33 cattle and 24 sheep. Oldest son Charles, age 25, was counted with wife Anne, age 17, a daughter of Abraham Dugas. They lived with a young daughter on 2 arpents of land and owned 12 cattle and 7 sheep. Anne gave Charles four children, including two sons who created their own families.

Also in the census was Jacques and Jeanne's married daughter Marie, age 18, who was counted with her first husband Pierre Sire or Cyr , a gunsmith, age Jacques dit Jacob and Jeanne's two younger sons, Germain and Guillaume, ages 21 and 16 in , also created families of their own. Germain married Madeleine, a daughter of Antoine Belliveau , two years after the census; she gave him three children, including a son who created a family of his own; Germain remarried to Madeleine, a daughter of Abraham Dugas , in c, and she gave him 10 more children, including two more sons who created their own families.

Guillaume married Marie-Anne, a daughter of Martin d'Aprendestiguy de Martignon , in the late s; she gave him a daughter who married a grandson of Daniel LeBlanc. Jean Poirier , a fisherman, also had come to the colony aboard the St. Jean died in c, 17 years before the first census was taken, but not before fathering a daughter and a son, both of whom appeared in the first census. Jean and Jeanne's son Michel was a year-old bachelor in He lived alone on "no cultivated land" but owned 2 head of cattle.

Michel married Marie, a daughter of Michel Boudrot , in c, and she gave him 11 children, including seven sons who created families of their own. Meanwhile, his mother Jeanne remarried to colonist Antoine Gougeon soon after his father Jean had died and gave Antoine a daughter, who would marry a son of Jean Blanchard in c Michel, who served as one of the first syndics at Port-Royal, was 71 years old in , and Michelle was They lived on 8 arpents of land with eight unmarried children, six sons and two daughters.

They owned 20 cattle and 12 sheep. She gave him eight children, including three sons who created families of their own; Charles remarried to Marie, a daughter of Jean Corporon, in c, and she would give him a dozen more children, including five more sons who created their own families. All of Michel's six younger sons created families of their own. He was 60 years old, and she was 42 in They lived on 5 arpents of cultivated land with three unmarried children, two sons--Guillaume, age 21, and Bernard, age and a daughter, age Jean and Radegonde owned 12 cattle and 9 sheep.

They lived on 15 arpents of land with no children, but they owned 5 cattle and 2 sheep. Martin's younger brother Guillaume married Huguette, a daughter of Antoine Gougeon , two years after the census, and she gave him a dozen children, including five sons who created their own families. Brother Bernard survived childhood but did not marry. They were living on 12 arpents of land with five children, including Anne-Marie's son Philippe Pinet , born at Port-Royal in c, who was being raised by his stepfather and using the Rimbault surname in but he go by his biological father's surname, Pinet , probably after her married.

She gave him a dozen children, including six sons who created their own families. Robert Cormier , a master ship's carpenter from La Rochelle, signed an indenture for three years with an associate of Nicolas Denys in early After Robert fulfilled his contract, he evidently took his family to Port-Royal, but he did not remain there. He likely returned to La Rochelle with his wife and son Jean in the s, perhaps to escape the turmoil then brewing in the colony. Robert's older son Thomas, however, who was a teenager in the early s, remained in the colony, where he, too, worked as a carpenter.

Thomas was 35 years old in and still being described as a carpenter; Madeleine was only Father Motin counted only one child, a daughter, in their household. They owned 6 arpents of land along the basin with 7 cattle and 7 sheep. Madeleine gave Thomas 10 children, including four sons who married granddaughters of Daniel LeBlanc and created families of their own. In , Claude was 45 years old, and Catherine was Living with them on 30 arpents of land were seven young children, four sons and three daughters.

They owned 26 cattle and 12 sheep. Catherine gave him 13 children, including three sons who created families of their own. Pierre Lejeune dit Briard of Brie, as his name reveals, came to Port-Royal by c, when he married a daughter of Germain Doucet whose name has been lost to history. Father Motin counted none of them at Port-Royal in They either were living in another Acadian settlement, or they were living outside of the colony.

Pierre dit Briard, fils married Marie, a daughter of Pierre Thibodeau , at Port-Royal in the late s, and she gave him nine children, including four sons who created families of their own. Two soldiers who had come to the colony in the early s with Emmanuel Le Borgne remained in Acadia, married, and became prominent settlers. Also establishing a family in the colony was Le Borgne 's second son, who had come to Acadia with his father in the s; because of his actions against the English, however, the young Le Borgne was forced to return to France, but, unlike his brothers, he did not remain there:.

Father Motin did not count him in the census, though he had returned to the colony in Evidently he did not get along well with some of Acadia's royal governors. When drunk he was capable of granting the same piece of land to several settlers at once, which could not but cause the farmers considerable vexation.

During most of that time, heirs of d'Aulnay and Charles La Tour contested Alexandre's and his family's claims in Acadia. Marie gave him seven children, including two sons who created families of their own. In , Pierre was age 40 and Jeanne age They were living on 7 arpents of land with six young children, a son and five daughters; the son was only a year old. They owned 12 cattle and 11 sheep. Jeanne gave Pierre 16 children, including seven sons who created families of their own. Pierre founded the Acadian settlement at Chepoudy, on the upper Bay of Fundy, in c In , Michel was age 41 and Marguerite They were living on 14 arpents of land with seven children, including a set of twins who were only a few weeks old.

They owned 15 cattle and 14 sheep. Madeleine gave him 10 children, including four sons who created families of their own. In c, Sancoucy remarried to Jeanne, a daughter of Antoine Babin , and she gave him two more sons, who also created their own families. Many of the Acadians who were counted in had come to the colony during the English occupation of , when immigration to Acadia from France and Canada was supposed to have been curtailed. At least two of them were Englishmen, one was a Dutchman in English service, one an Irishman, and another from Flanders.

In , Antoine was age 45, and Jeanne was 45 also. They were living on 10 arpents of land with their only child, daughter Huguette, age They owned 20 cattle and 17 sheep. Huguette married Guillaume, younger son of Jean Blanchard , in c, when she was only 16 years old. She gave him a dozen children. In the late s, Guillaume helped pioneer the Acadian settlement at Petitcoudiac. Their sons settled there, too, at what became known as Village-des- Blanchard s. Pierre Melanson dit La Verdure, a French Huguenot in English service, came to the colony in the spring of with his English wife Priscilla and three sons, who had been born in England.

Evidently Pierre dit La Verdure served as tutor of former govneror d'Aulnay's children. When the English abandoned the colony in , Pierre dit La Verdure, his wife, and their youngest son John retreated to Boston, but the two older sons remained at Port-Royal, where they had converted to Catholicism and taken Acadian wives. In , Pierre was age about 39 and was listed as a tailor, and Marguerite was However, Father Molin noted, Pierre and his wife refused to answer any questions about their farm or their family. Pierre and Marguerite would have been living with their three oldest children, two sons and a daughter, but the size of their farm in remains a mystery.

Marguerite gave him 11 children, including four sons who created families of their own. Charles was a little more cooperative with the census taker than his older brother. He was 28 years old in , and Marie was They lived with four small children, all daughters, but they did not give the size of their farm. They did admit that they owned 40 cattle and 6 sheep. Marie gave Charles 14 children, including five sons who created families of their own.

In , Laurent, listed as a seaman, was age 34, and Marie was They were living on 4 arpents of land with two small children, a daughter and a son, the youngest only 9 months old. They owned 5 cattle and 6 sheep. Marie gave him nine children, including five sons who created families of their own. Jean Pitre , an edge tool maker probably from Flanders, came to the colony in the late s. In c, he married Marie, a daughter of Isaac Pesseley , former major of Port-Royal who had been killed during the civil war between La Tour and d'Aulnay.

In , Jean was age 35 and Marie age They were living on "no land" with three young children, a son and two daughters, the youngest one only 9 months old. They owned no sheep, but they did own 1 cow. Marie gave him 11 children, including four sons who created families of their own. In , Anne was 26 years old and living with those children, three daughter and two sons, the youngest one, a son, only 2 years old, on 6 arpents of cultivated land.

She owned 6 cattle and 3 sheep. In Acadia, the "de" in his name did not survive, nor did his given name. In , Michel, as he was called in Acadia, was 33 years old, and Marie was They were living on 2 arpents of cultivated land with three young children, all sons. They owned 12 cattle and 2 sheep. Marie gave him six children, including four sons who created families of their own. In c, Michel remarried to Jacqueline dite Jacquette, a daughter of Martin Benoit , and she gave him another daughter who also survived childhood.

Other colonial records, including later censuses, provide their ages and the number of their children when the first census was taken. They would have been living with 6 children, four sons and two daughters, the youngest a newborn. In , they owned 22 acres of land and 20 cattle, so their farm in probably was larger than most. Marie gave him 15 children, including eight sons who created families of their own! The result would be an even larger branch of the Landry family in Acadia. In , Antoine was age 45, and Marie was They were living on 2 arpents of cultivated land with five young children, two sons and three daughters, the youngest only a year old.

Another daughter was born to them soon after the census was taken. They owned 6 cattle and 8 sheep. Marie gave Antoine 11 children, including three sons who created families of their own. In , Pierre was age 40 and Anne age They were living on 16 arpents of land with four young children, two sons and two daughters. For some reason, their younger daughter, who would have been only 3 years of age and who survived childhood, was not counted. Like all of his older siblings, he, too, survived childhood, and, like two of his older brothers, he created a family of his own.

They were living on 6 arpents of cultivated land with three young children, two sons and a daughter, the youngest, a son, only 3 months old. Also living with them was year-old Marie Potet from Marie's first marriage. Michel and Marie owned 5 cattle and 1 sheep. Marie gave him five children, including three sons who created families of their own. He left and told his wife that she was not to tell me the number of his livestock or land.

They would have been living with three young children, two sons and a daughter, the youngest one, a son, only 2 years old. In , however, he owned 1 acre and 19 cattle, so his farm was small, but the number of his animals was respectable. They lived on 1 arpent of land with three young children, all daughters, the youngest only 2 days old. They owned 1 sheep. Guyon and Jeanne were not listed in the census because they had moved to Mouchecoudabouet, now Musquodoboit Harbor, near present-day Halifax, soon after they married, and they were still there in late Jeanne died at Chignecto in the early s.

His four sons were by his first wife. They all created their own families. The two older sons settled at Chignecto, but his younger sons, one of whom called himself a Giasson , settled in Canada. Olivier Daigre came to the colony by c, when he married Marie, a daughter of Denis Gaudet.

In , Olivier was age 28, and Marie was They lived on 2 arpents of cultivated land with three young children, all sons. Marie gave Olivier 10 children, including two sons who created families of their own. They owned 3 cattle and 2 sheep. Pierre Lanoue , a "young scion of a noble Huguenot family in France," after converting to Catholicism, came to Acadia in c as a cooper and settled at Port-Royal.

When asked his age, Pierre told Father Molin that "he felt fine but would not give an answer. In , Pierre would have been only 23 years old. He was still a bachelor, so he may have owned no property. She gave him only one child, a son, Pierre, fils , who married Marie, a daughter of Laurent Granger , at Port-Royal in November ; Marie gave Pierre, fils nine children, including six sons who created families of their own.

Aïe Aïe Aïe !

Their daughter, "6 weeks of age," the priest noted, was "not yet named. Little Marie survived childhood and married a son of Michel Boudrot. In , Pierre was age 32, and Catherine was They lived on 15 arpents of land with a 2-year-old daughter and owned 6 cattle and 5 sheep. Catherine gave Pierre seven children, including a son, Charles, who married Anne, a daughter of Bernard Bourg , at Port-Royal in c; she gave him nine children, including four sons who created families of their own.

Roger dit Jean Caissie , an Irishman, came to the colony probably during the late s as a soldier in English service. Roger , whom Father Molin called a Kuessy , was 25 years old in , and Marie was They lived on "no cultivated land" with a 2-year-old daughter, but they did own 3 cattle and 2 sheep. Some of Roger 's descendants would use his given name as a dit , which would evolve into the surname, Roger.

Pierre Cyr , an armurier or gunsmith, came to the colony by c, when he married Marie, a daughter of Jacques Bourgeois. Pierre, who Father Molin called a Sire , was age 27, and Marie was 18 in They lived on 5 arpents of land with their 3-month-old son, Jean. They owned 11 cattle and 6 sheep. Marie gave Pierre only two more children, both of them sons.

However, they and their oldest brother created families of their own. Also in the census was long-time settler Philippe Mius , sieur d'Entremont Father Molin spelled it Landremont , the seigneur of Pobomcoup, now Pubnico, at Cap-Sable, on the Atlantic side of the peninsula. Philippe was age 62 in Father Molin did say that Philippe and Madeleine lived with four children, two sons and two daughters, ages 17 to 2, and that they owned 26 cattle, 29 sheep, 12 goats, and 20 hogs on their barony at Pobomcoup.

Their oldest child, daughter Marguerite, age 21, was counted at Port-Royal with her husband Pierre Melanson dit La Verdure, fils , age Philippe and Madeleine's sons Jacques dit Pobomcoup, Abraham dit Pleinmarais, and Philippe d'Azy , created families of their own, and, as his name implies, oldest son Jacques inherited his father's seigneury. Also in the colony in , but not counted in the first census, was Poitou native Jean Serreau , sieur de Saint-Aubin and seigneur of Ste.

In late , French authorities conducted another census at Port-Royal. Unlike Father Molin's counting of , however, the census taker in gave only the names of family heads and their spouses. Most of the families who had been counted in were still living along the basin, and some had moved on to other settlements, including the new one at Chignecto. Most interestingly, a few new family names appeared in this latest counting, hinting that the Acadian population continued to grow not only by natural increase but also by immigration.

Some of the new settlers had come to Acadia aboard L'Oranger , which had reached Port-Royal in , only months after the first census had been taken. Others had arrived on ships from France whose names have been lost to history. Some had come to Port-Royal via Canada. Half a dozen years later, in , Jacques de Meulles, seigneur de La Source, intendant of New France, on orders from his superiors in France, spent months conducting a tour of Acadia.

His primary mission was "to report on the resources of the area and particularly on the possibility of establishing sedentary fishing stations, which would provide employment for the Canadians and a market for [Canada's] agricultural produce. Again, as in the census at Port-Royal, familiar names were found in the colony in even greater numbers, and many new names appeared.

Happily for historians and genealogists, the census of was as detailed as the first one. Many of the new settlers appearing in de Meulles's census would create family lines in Acadia:. Pierre does not appear in the Port-Royal census of because not long after their marriage he and Marguerite moved to the new Acadian settlement at Chignecto. That year, in his census, De Meulles's noted that " Arsenault , who resides in Port-Royal[,] owns in the seigneurie of Beaubassin [Chignecto] 1 gun, 30 arpents, 8 cattle, 4 sheep, 6 hogs.

They were counted at Port-Royal with Pierre's two sons by his first wife who created families of their own. Second wife Marie gave Pierre seven more children, including four more sons who created their own families. Jean Doiron likely came to the colony on L'Oranger. They do not appear in the census. In , de Meulles called him a Douaron and said Jean was age 37, and Marianne was They lived at Port-Royal with seven children, six sons and a daughter.

De Meulles did not give the size of their farm, but he noted that they owned 1 gun, 7 cattle, and 1 sheep. Marie-Anne gave Jean four more children, including two more sons. In the early s, Jean remarried to Marie, a daughter of Guillaume Trahan , and she gave him eight more children, four sons and two daughters--so he fathered 19 children in all, including 11 sons who created families of their own! They were not counted at Port-Royal in , but de Meulles found them there in He recorded that Jacques was age 40, and Marguerite was They lived with four children, who de Meulles did not name, and owned 5 sheep and 3 hogs.

Marguerite gave Jacques six children, including three sons who created families of their own. They were counted at Port-Royal in and again in In , Martin, called a Benoist , was age 42, and Marie was They lived with six children, four sons and two daughters. De Meulles did not give the size of their farm, but he noted that they owned 4 hogs. Marie gave him 10 children, including five sons who created families of their own. Marie, interestingly enough, had been counted in the first Acadian census of , age 61, widow of Jean Claude , her second husband, and living at Port-Royal alone, and again at Port-Royal in , still a widow, no age given, when son Martin Aucoin , fils would have been ages 20 and 27, respectively.

He married Marie, a daughter of Denis Gaudet , at Port-Royal in c, but they did not appear in the census. Evidently they were among the early settlers at Minas. De Meulles noted that Martin, fils was 35 years old in , and Marie was They lived at Minas with eight children, four sons and four daughters, the youngest one, a daughter, only 7 months old. They owned 1 gun, 15 cattle, 10 sheep, and 6 hogs.

Marie Gaudet gave Martin 19 children, including nine sons who created families of their own! De Meulles counted them at Port-Royal in Julien was age 33 and Charlotte They were living with four children, the youngest one, a daughter age 1. The intendant did not give the size of their farm of the number of their animals.

Charlotte gave Julien nine children, including four sons who created families of their own. They remained in the Port-Royal area. Evidently he did not like what he saw on the island and returned to Port-Royal, enduring British rule there. Jeanne gave him 10 children, including five sons, all born at Port-Royal, four of whom created families of their own.

Dominique, called Garault , was age 60; Marie's age was unrecorded. They owned 4 sheep and 3 hogs. They lived with four small children, a son and three daughters. The intendant did not record the size of their farm, but he noted that they owned 8 cattle and 7 sheep. De Meulles them at Minas in They lived with three small children, two sons and a daughter. The intendant did not record the size of their farm, but he noted that they owned 3 cattle and 1 hog. She gave him three more children, including another son who created a family of his own. She gave him eight children, including four sons who created their own families.

De Meulles found them still at Port-Royal in They lived with three children, a son and two daughters, the younger daughter "not yet They owned 1 gun, 7 cattle, 6 sheep, and 5 hogs. The activities of two of those sons, Alexandre and Joseph dit Beausoleil, would write the family's name large in Acadian history. De Meulles counted them at Minas in Living with them a single arpent of land were four young sons, the youngest one only 2. They owned 1 gun, 1 cow, 3 sheep, and 3 hogs. De Meulles counted him as a servant in the seigneur's household at Chignecto in Michel was age 22 and single.

French-English Dictionary (35, Entries)

He remained at Chignecto and married Anne, a daughter of Thomas Cormier , in c She gave him a dozen children, including six sons who created families of their own. Michel's sons used his dit , Gallant , which, in some of their lines, evolved into a surname. De Meulles found them at Minas in They were living with three children, two sons and a daughter, ages 5, 3, and 1. De Meulles did not give the size of their holdings, but he did note that they owned a gun. Jeanne gave Laroche 10 children, including three sons who created families of their own.

Claude, called La Verdure, was age 35, and Marguerite, whose given name was not recorded, was They were living with one child, whose gender and age was not recorded. Claude's daughter Jeanne by his first wife their only child had been born at Beaubassin in June , so she would have been 5 at the time of the census. Only three of his children by Marguerite--sons Claude, fils , Jean-Baptiste, and Charles--would have been born by the time of the census. Marguerite gave Claude 11 children, including four sons who created families of their own.

Jean-Baptiste was one of them, but his fate was not a pleasant one; along with his oldest son and three Mi'kmaq Indians, he was hanged at Boston, Massachusetts, in November for piracy. Pierre's father Claude was a carpenter. Pierre and his family, in fact, lived with Irishman Roger Caissie at Chignecto while completing his work there.

Pierre also owned property at Port-Royal. De Meulles did not give the size of Jeanne's farm or the number of her animals. Also counted in the census were two of Pierre and Jeanne's married children. Living with them were three young children, two sons and two daughters, the youngest, a daughter, only five months old. De Meulles did not give the size of their farm, but he did note that they owned 7 cattle and 7 sheep.

Laurent was a miller, which may explain why the intendant did not give the size of his farm. Laurent took his family back to Beaubassin in the early s. Also counted in the census was Pierre and Jeanne's fourth daughter, Marie-Madeleine, age 20, with her husband Robert Henry , age 43, and their four young children. She gave him a dozen children, including eight sons who created families of their own. They remained on the St. Marie-Jeanne gave him three children, two daughters and a son; the daughters married at St.

Robert was age 43, and Marie-Madeleine was De Meulles did not record the size of their farm, but he did say that they owned 1 gun, 4 cattle, and 10 sheep. Marie-Madeleine gave Robert 13 children, including six sons that created families of their own. One of their daughters, Madeleine, gave birth to a son whose father is unknown; the boy survived childhood, called himself an Henry , and also created his own family.

Nicolas, called a Barillot , was age 40, and Martine was They were living with a two-year-old daughter. The intendant did not give the size of their farm or the numbers of their animals. Martine gave Nicolas nine children, including four sons who created families of their own. They were living with a two-year-old daughter on an arpent of land.

They owned 2 guns and 1 hog. They were living with a daughter, age 2. De Meulles did not give the size of their farm or the number of their animals. Mathieu, fils 's grant, which he received in September , lay along an upper stretch of the river between Jemseg and Nashwaak; with the grant came the title, sieur de Freneuse. Louis, sieur de Chaffours, was age 32, but wife Marguerite's age was unrecorded. The intendant found them with no children. Mathieu, fils , sieur de Freneuse, was age 28, but wife Louise's age was not recorded, nor did de Meulles record them with any children.

De Meulles did not give the young sieur's age, but he would have been Jean, called Jean de Bastarache , was age 25, and Huguette was They lived with a daughter who was only 7 months old. Pierre, called Joan , was age 60, and Madeleine was They lived with six of her unmarried Trahan children, ages 19 to 9, and their own child, a daughter, Susanne, age 2 months, on 8 arpents of land. They owned 10 cattle, 10 sheep, and 2 guns.

V. 68, ex. 86‑90, pp. 53‑55 & 95.

Claude, called Bertran , was age 35, and Catherine was De Meulles noted that "they live at Cap de Sable. Oldest child Claude, fils was born the year of the census, so they probably were childless when De Meulles counted them. Catherine gave Claude 10 children, including four sons who created families of their own, but oldest son Claude, fils was not one of them.

They had no children, but "a servant," Charles Gourdeau , age 40, lived with them. He remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Jean Meunier , in c She gave him a dozen children, including two sons who created families of their own. Also in the colony in the s were men who did not appear in de Meulles's census but who would create significant family lines in Acadia. One of them, in fact, was a high colonial official who fell in love with an Acadian girl:. The younger son, Jean, also was born in Acadia, date unrecorded. Both sons survived childhood and created families of their own.

Louis Saulnier , a sailor, married Louise Bastineau dit Peltier in c, but they, too, were not counted in the census of , probably because they were living in the new Acadian settlement at Minas. The next step is to bring the family together to share the aligned vision and help create the roadmap that will get.

This involves quarterbacking the succession process with their professional team and keeping them accountable to get the plan to the finish line. There is no cookie cutter process for this, each family is unique just like their farm business. Their parents are usually afraid of the impact or outcome if they share this information.


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At this point, if the time is right, it is important to disclose this information. Not only does the next generation need to know, it will help them understand. Financial statements help tell the story of why we make the decisions we do today. Parents sometimes assume they know what their children want or what they are thinking. Technology and lack of actual face-to-face time creates barriers. These challenges often lead us to not really knowing what the next generation wants for their future and how we can find common ground to move forward.

One of the first things I do when I meet with farm families is observe the dynamic and how they conduct themselves around the kitchen table. Or do they wait for the autocratic leader to speak for the tribe? Do they stay calm, respect one another, give each other a chance to speak? For some families to succeed at meetings we help create a code of conduct, which is essentially rules of engagement that lay the foundation for respectful behaviour.

These meetings begin the process of building a participatory culture, where everyone can safely come with ideas and feel like they are pulling the rope in the same direction. This creates a positive environment that allows everyone the opportunity to contribute to the growth and success of the farms future. Improving communication can begin with having regular family dinners.

We need to take the time to share the stories of the past. Reminding the family of how we got to where we are today, while also encouraging the next generation to have a voice. Because together, we are better. Email: darrell farmlifefinancial. Pour certains, leur un repas. Je ne suis pas le banquier September Canadian Jersey Breeder. Attendent-ils que le leader autoritaire de la tribu parle? Restent-ils calmes? Se respectent-ils? Are you looking to support the Jersey breed in a unique and gratifying way? Sponsor a Jersey class at the Royal!

All sponsors will be listed in the Royal Jersey program and recognized in the December issue of the Canadian Jersey Breeder. If you require a calf, please let us know at the time of registration. Si vous avez besoin d'un veau, veuillez nous en informer. Suivez-nous, aimez nos statuts, partagez-les et re-tweetez.

Jersey Canada is always looking for volunteers to assist at the Royal. The timing of the sale has also changed to an afternoon slot. New this year, the sale will include Jersey lots as well as Holsteins. For more information about consigning your Jerseys, contact:. The RAWF is a premier event that showcases the best dairy cattle to local, national and international visitors. To that end, it is important that dairy exhibitors showcase their cattle in the best way possible - with top tier animals and a clean barn.

We would like to remind exhibitors that you may bring in a maximum of 24 hours of feed and bedding and that all feed, hay and straw MUST be contained within the feed aisles between stalls. While the stalling configuration can accommodate small square bales of hay and straw, large round bales are a challenge to store and keep tidy.

Rule Reminder Changing the natural colour of an animal is prohibited. The scholarships are available to all young Canadian Jersey enthusiasts enrolled in at least the second year of study at any post-secondary College or University. Candidates must not have previously been awarded a Jersey Canada Youth Scholarship.

Deadline: September 17, Learn more: www. Jersey Canada Director Elections Jersey Canada members are reminded of the elections which are to take place this fall. The following areas are due for election, and the incumbents in these regions are: District: Ontario1 - John Vander Wielen District: Quebec 1 - Joshawa Barter District: Atlantic 1 - Rhonda Hulan District: West 1 - David Morey President Based on constitutional amendments approved by the membership in March , elections will be held in districts Ontario 1, Quebec 1, and Atlantic 1 for three-year terms to begin at the Annual General Meeting to be held in April An election will also be held for the district West 1, to fill the remaining year for the seat currently held by President, David Morey.

This one-year term will begin at the Annual General Meeting to be held in April Please note that incumbents MUST be re-nominated to be eligible for re-election. Nomination for the office of director must be made in writing, to be received at the office of the Association by the 30th day of September. Nomination forms are available from the national office. If, on October 1st, there is only one valid nomination in the electoral district, the nominee shall be declared elected.

2 Contes - Le Loup et les 7 Chevreaux + Les 3 Petits cochons avec les P'tits z'Amis

Date limite: 17 septembre En savoir plus: www. Les formulaires de mise en candidature sont disponibles au bureau national. The Canadian Jersey Breeder publication offers that interesting balance of news, stories and hard data in every issue. Whether you wish to highlight champion show results, showcase a productive Jersey, or bring attention to a tremendous cow family - The Breeder will reach your target market. It also serves as a powerful platform to feature animals for sale and inform readers of various products and services that are farm and dairy related.

Raymond : ray. Biotechnologies have directly benefitted the three core scientific disciplines of animal science - genetics, nutrition, and health Table 1. By Alison L. Breeders could conceptually use GE Cryopreservation Ionophores Bioinformatics alongside conventional breeding to facilitate genetic improvement. Semen and embryo sexing Molecular gut microbiology To date, a few GE animals have been approved for biomedical Cloning Silage additives enzymes and pharmaceutical production including goats, rabbits and chickens.

Biotechnologies used in animal production Table 2. There to obtain food Lysostaphin Bacterial Mastitis resistance is opposition to the use of certain biotechnologies to improve regulatory Monosaturated fatty production efficiency based on the argument that their use is Goat Rat-Bovine Mastitis resistance approval is the acids associated with decreased animal welfare. Coli-Mouse Feed uptake the three components of sustainability: environmental, economic Growth hormone Human-Porcine Growth rate and social.

Sustainability is often depicted as three intersecting circles, with a sweet spot in the center cSKI Chicken Muscle development representing the sustainable production system Lysozyme Human Piglet survival nirvana Figure 1. The three intersecting can simultaneously fulfil all sustainability goals. Special interest groups often apply political pressure based on their prioritization Animal Welfare Aspects of Gene Editing of one of the sustainability goals. Gene editing refers to the use of site-directed of sustainability.

The outcomes of these processes HDR can add, delete, or replace letters in the genetic code at the location of the break by providing the appropriate template nucleic acid. With NHEJ, although the location of the cut site is very precise, the exact change that occurs when the DNA is repaired is random so a number of different outcomes representing minor sequence insertions or deletions, termed indels, are possible. Figure 2. Gene editing has many potential animal welfare applications.

It can be used to correct diseases and disorders that have a genetic basis by altering the error that resulted in the disease phenotype. Examples of successful gene edited agricultural alleles for applications in food animal species. Gene editing could enable the development of approaches to produce single gender offspring for industries like laying hens where only the female produces the saleable product. Similarly, gene editing approaches are being developed to eliminate testes development and the need to castrate males, which may address important welfare concerns such as the fate of male layer chicks and castration of male pigs.

Animal Welfare Aspects of Breeding Genetic improvement has been an important component of the tremendous advances in agricultural productivity that have occurred over the past 50 years. Animal genetics has made significant contributions to the interplay between the environmental, social and economic goals of sustainability.

Genetic gains are permanent and cumulative meaning that gains made in one year are transmitted to subsequent generations. Traditional breeding programs have focused on production traits such as milk yield, growth rate and meat yield. Key social goals such as food safety, food quality, environmental protection, and animal welfare were not overtly included in breeding objectives. Some important examples where functional traits have been added to breeding objectives include the incorporation of fertility and disease resistance traits into dairy cattle selection indexes, and the inclusion of leg traits into poultry breeding.

Table 4 shows dairy traits that are currently included in the Canadian dairy selection index. Emphasis and Factor vary by breed. Behavioural traits have also been incorporated into selection criteria. Ethical questions have been raised with respect to selecting for behaviors that better suit an animal to an agricultural production environment, with some advocating that the production environment should be modified to suit the animal. However, it should be recognized that livestock populations have been selected for behavioral traits since their domestication.

While altering the environment by moving to pasture based systems, for example, might be appropriate in some cases, such a change needs to be considered in the context of undesirable negative impacts e. Conceivably, selection to better suit a population of animals to their production environment could improve both animal welfare and productivity, thereby working towards multiple sustainability goals. An example from the poultry industry illustrates this point well. In , a selection experiment was performed on a line of White Leghorns to improve adaptability and well-being of layers in large multiple-bird cages.

Feather and vent pecking, and sometimes cannibalism, can occur in multi-pen cages, a problem that can be managed with trimming the beaks of young birds. An unselected control, with approximately the same number of breeders as the selected line, was maintained for comparison and housed in single-bird cages. Mortality of the selected line in multiple-bird cages was similar to that of the unselected control in one-bird cages. The data suggested group selection could eliminate the need to beak-trim to avoid cannibalism by breeding hens to better suit multiplebird cage production systems.

These outcomes align with several sustainability goals, including decreased cannibalism and a resultant improvement in animal welfare, better production efficiency, reduced need for beak trimming, and group housing rather than singlebird cages. In reality, it is likely that moving to alternative production systems e. With too much territory, birds become territorial and it is not uncommon to have much greater mortality in floor pens than cages due to the increased area.

Conclusion Biotechnology is a broad term that encompasses many technologies that are routinely used in animal agriculture. Emerging biotechnologies offer great potential, especially in the area of animal breeding. Breeding can contribute to improved animal welfare in two ways. First, welfare traits can be included in breeding objectives to select for improved animal welfare and decreased disease incidence.

Secondly, modern molecular tools offer the opportunity to introduce novel genetic variation into animal genomes to address welfare concerns like dehorning and castration, in addition to correcting diseases and disorders that have a genetic basis. Developing livestock that are more resilient and less susceptible to disease is an important component of the development of more productive and sustainable animal agricultural systems globally. Van Eenennaam, PhD. September Canadian Jersey Breeder Over Ex cows have been bred at Marbo. Jersey Canada released its new website in July and the feedback has been outstanding.

Explore our site! So please contact us info jerseycanada. Join us! Send your information to shawna jerseycanada. There is no charge to be listed, however dairy products must be regulated under the Canadian Food Inspection Agency CFIA and processors must have a provincial licence to process milk. Contact us to be listed! Website Banner ADs are located at the top of our website and viewed on every inside page within the site. ADs are now larger and scrolling drawing extra attention to a sale, dispersal, cow family, bull or product.

We can also link to a video, sale catalogue, webpage or social media site URL of your choice. Web Banner ADs present incredible value for our advertisers and typically sell out early. Book your spot today. Canada is the second largest country in the world and one of the largest agricultural producers and exporters. Explorez notre site! Veuillez donc nous contacter info jerseycanada. Contactez nous pour vous inscrire! This is a good thing. I see the mission of the modern farmer, veterinarian, nutritionist, and other farm advisors, as striving to prove this proverb wrong.

One of the most important production diseases in modern dairy, especially for those milking Jersey cows, is milk fever aka parturient paresis and post-parturient hypocalcemia. The condition was first described in , corresponding with a focus on breeding and feeding for higher production in cows.

I have scoured the literature to understand where the term milk fever originated, as the condition is NOT associated with a fever, in fact cows tend to have LOWER temperatures. Most farmers that milk Jersey cows are well able to treat clinical cases of milk fever. There are, however, a few things to keep in mind prior to treatment.

List of brands - World

I always do a full physical exam prior to administering calcium intravenously IV. In addition, cows with toxic mastitis are at a higher risk of death with IV calcium treatments. Also, tears in the vagina and uterus are possible and would affect the prognosis for that cow. Uncomplicated cases where a cow is unable to rise require So, what is milk fever and why does it occur? This Calcium is an essential mineral responsible for a variety of func- needs to be administered slowly over minutes, as too tions in the body.

Whenever any muscle contracts, calcium is rapid a rise in blood calcium could cause heart arrhythmias there. Whenever a nerve cell and possibly cardiac arrest. It is fires, calcium is there. Need always a good idea to collect a strong bones, fully functioning pre-treatment sample of blood enzymes, and proper blood clot in the event that the cow does formation in your cow? Well then, not respond to the initial calcium she needs calcium. It comes as 1. Cows are unable to rise. IV bolus. This sample should be no surprise then that through a refrigerated and sent to your 2.

Skin and extremities become cool. After IV absorption of dietary calcium, calcium is administered, I typically 4. The gastrointestinal tract stops contracting. Breathing becomes shallow and rapid. Cows become dull and depressed. Labour could be delayed. Around calving, modern hours. If the down cow den shift in calcium from their blood to their udders. Cows that needs to be moved i. If this is not possible, gently rolling the down cow into Jerseys, having fewer vitamin D receptors, are less able to re- a stationary loader bucket filled with straw is also an acceptable spond to periods of rapid calcium needs, as seen around calving.

Vitamin D is required for calcium absorption from the intestines, Up next: Prevention as well as triggering calcium release from bone storage sites. If a cow survives but, for what- pocalcemia is and how it is treated, our next article in the Deever reason stays down for prolonged periods of time despite cember issue of the Canadian Jersey Breeder will outline some intravenous calcium therapy, her life is still in jeopardy. There steps that you can take to prevent milk fever on your farm.

Stay is a tremendous amount of weight placed on vital nerves and tuned! Si on les laisse sans traitement, les vaches vont mourir. Il Quand un muscle se contracte, 1. Les vaches sont incapables de se lever. Quand une cel- 2. La respiration devient faible et rapide. Eh bien, elle a de calcium IV, je recommande de donner besoin de calcium.

Rachel was raised in Eastern Ontario on a dairy farm. She spent most of her childhood summers helping in the fields and hayloft and was always found after school assisting with evening chores. Rachel brings over 20 years of customer service experience to Jersey Canada. She is a lifelong learner, Rachel Shilletto, an amateur photographer, loves gardening and enjoys Jersey Canada Bilingual creating new art projects with her two children. If you Registrar and Customer have any registry questions, please contact Rachel!

Service Representative. My goal is to complete the registrations and transfers as quickly as possible with high accuracy. There are occasions when information received is incomplete and I will contact owners to fill in the blanks. Typically, I will start my day by checking my emails for responses from owners with answers to complete either the registration or transfer. I will then start calling owners to find the missing pieces of information to complete unresolved issues.

This can be a time-consuming process. The only exception should be a premature birth. Please double check your dates before completing your registrations or include a comment that the animal was premature. Remember to check your certificate to ensure you are listed as the current owner. All flushed animals require testing either genomic or microsatellite to prevent long delays in processing your registrations.

A good rule of thumb is to ask your veterinarian to send it to us once a flush is complete. These can be emailed. We will keep the report on file until we need to use it. This is typically a number between 1 and 20 depending on the number of embryos collected in the flush. If you can check these boxes, you will most likely avoid a call from me and your registration will be processed quickly.

Please call me if you have any questions. Si vous avez des questions au sujet du registraire, veuillez contacter Rachel! Ceci peut demander beaucoup de temps. Established in , the All Canadian Contest is a Jersey Canada award program that recognizes top Jerseys on the Canadian show circuit. Traditionally these cows enjoy the attention and prestige of being named an All Canadian. Along with their photo and qualifying show results, winning and nominated cows are showcased in the February issue of the Jersey Breeder magazine, as well as listed on the Jersey Canada website and announced through email and social media channels.

What open class is your Jersey in for ? The herd must have been shown as a group at least once and at least 1 animal must have been consistently present in all placings listed on the entry form. To serve you better, Jersey Canada continues to find a contest application platform that is both efficient and user friendly. We have a new entry application process for that we will be beta testing. With the exception of 4-H classes, the rules themselves have not changed, but the application process has. This supports 4-H privacy policies and youth inclusivity. If you are entering an animal in one of our 4-H classes, please go to the All Canadian 4-H Rules on page 38, as eligibility and information to be submitted is different from the OPEN classes.

As in the past, the All Canadian Contest continues to be offered online, but is now active. For OPEN classes, you will notice that we require very little information from you to complete an entry and that this process demands very little time or computer experience from applicants and is extremely user friendly. Provided that your entry is accurate registration and animal name the remaining information that we typically require animal birthdate, owners, show results will be extracted from our pedigree database Canadian herdbook.

If you are unable to complete the application electronically, please give us a call at Note: If you are entering US animals that are not in our pedigree database. You must provide your Canadian show results for verification. This information must be emailed to: info jerseycanada. Animals must be registered at All submitted animals must place in the top eight 8 at the Royal National Jersey Show or place in the top four 4 in at least one qualifying show in order to be eligible for the contest. Verify your information first!

If you find that the results are not accurate, give us a call. What is a qualifying All Canadian show? Late entries will not be accepted! What if I sold my Jersey throughout the year? Animals that have changed ownership during the current show year will be entered in the contest. It is the responsibility of the entrant to consult with the current owner and inform Jersey Canada if recognition is to be different than that of ownership on the pedigree. Does my entry require a photo? Only professional 5 x 7 side view digital portrait photographs taken during the current show year will be accepted.

Jersey Canada will be processing a mass download from Vicki Fletcher in November for photos taken at the Royal and match it to the application. In this case, you do not need to send us a photo. If you choose to use a photo from a different photographer, it is the responsibility of the applicant to email it to us: info jerseycanada. What is the cost to enter the contest? What is the judging process? Approximately judges will be selected from a list of candidates that judged All Canadian qualifying shows. Contest judges will rank their choice for the top six 6 animals in each class and the total point aggregate will determine the All Canadian, Reserve All Canadian, Honorable Mention, and three nominees for each class.

When will the contest results be announced? What 4-H class is your Jersey in for ? Quelle est la classe 4-H pour votre Jersey en ? Is my Jersey eligible? You must include both the 4-H placing as well as the placing in the open show if applicable e. Information may be randomly verified at the Jersey Canada office. If false information is submitted, the applicant will be disqualified and charged for their entry.

View the standards of show rules and regulations at jerseycanada. Do I qualify? By entering the contest, you are giving consent for Jersey Canada to publish your name and show results on all media. When is the entry deadline? Est-ce que je me qualifie? Dis-je envoyer une photo avec mon inscription? Dans quelle classe ouverte est votre Jersey en ? Si votre inscription est exacte no. Quelles sont les expositions de qualification pour le Tout Canadien? Quel est le processus de jugement?

Frank is right so much of the time. Life is about solutions. Jerseys and Jersey milk are a solution! A recent Progressive Dairyman article mentioned steps to improving margins when margins are paper thin, or thinner. This point referred to the importance of achieving high yield and high percentages of butterfat and protein, the two main components in modern milk pricing. As dairy producers across the world work to improve income and lower costs, in Canada there is an obvious solution to. It comes in the form of a breed that has been growing, year after year, for over two decades.

At the Board level we talk about farm profit and discuss milk cheque fluctuations across the country. Many of our Board members have phased in or out more than one breed in the barn so although the power of observation and cash flow speaks for itself, they wanted something more tangible to share with people looking for solutions. This chatter stimulated a gathering of numbers and we performed some basic math comparing returns for Jersey milk to returns for industry average milk, which is included below.

Often, the proof is in the pudding and the numbers are not surprising to some. In the P5 Eastern Pool returns for Jersey milk were also higher than industry average milk at This is significant and quite consistent over the past six months. Let's not forget that Jersey milk doesn't magnify the issue of surplus skim milk powder. Then, add in other Jersey advantages that contribute to an even better bottom line. Has there ever been a better time to milk Jerseys in Canada?

If you're milking Jerseys, you're already part of something amazing. For dairy producers, pooling agreements are a good tool to manage the financial risks associated with the evolution of the domestic market. In its role as a national industry facilitator, the Canadian Dairy Commission CDC administers these pooling agreements on behalf of the dairy industry.